How Atmospheric Sounding Transformed Weather Prediction

In the late 1950s, a scientist named Lewis Kaplan divined a new and groundbreaking way to calculate temperature in the atmosphere for weather forecasting: by measuring the vibration of molecules at different altitudes. The hope was to do this using a brand-new technology, an Earth-observing satellite. At the time, the only way to get a reading on atmospheric temperature was to dispatch high-altitude weather balloons, or radiosondes. Weather balloons collected…

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Synthetic Material Heals and Strengthens Itself Using Carbon from Air

A new synthetic material that can strengthen and repair itself could be beneficial for the construct industry if enhanced further. Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have created the new material that can react with carbon dioxide from the air to grow, strengthen and repair itself by performing a chemical process similar to how plants incorporate carbon dioxide from the air into growing tissues. “This is a completely new concept in…

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New Antibody Breaks Through Cancer’s Defense System

A newly engineered antibody holds promise in leading the fight against cancerous tumors. Researchers from the University of Southampton have developed a new antibody that could unlock cancer’s defense against the body’s immune system by targeting 4-1BB, an immune receptor that can activate the killer T-cells to find and destroy cancer cells. The researchers found that 4-1BB is present mainly on a population of T cells within regulatory T cells,…

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New 3D Crime Scene Mapping Tool Turns Incident Scenes into Virtual 3D Models

When officers arrive at a crime or crash scene, they have to spend a lot of time looking for evidence, processing it, taking photos of it, and documenting. To help make this process more efficient, the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) has teamed up with the Israeli Police to invest in a new tool. The tool, called 3D-Hawk, can turn a crash or crime scene into an…

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Redesigning the Fire Extinguisher to Suck Fire in Space

The Department of Mechanical Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed an unusual fire extinguisher that sucks flames and burning materials into a vacuum chamber. Once safely captured inside the chamber, the flames and materials are suffocated or extinguished. Dubbed Vacuum Extinguish Method (VEM), the reverse concept extinguisher is geared toward special environments that are highly enclosed, such as space vehicles and different types of space transportation, and submarines.…

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University of Miami Partners to Build Spacecraft Structures for Air Force Research Laboratory

The U.S. Air Force Laboratory’s (USAF) composites branch has partnered with the University of Miami, Louisiana Tech University, University of Arkansas and the University of Texas to highlight the application of 3D printed carbon fiber and epoxy components on air and spacecraft structures. The partnership comes after Emrah Celik, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering’s Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, spent his summer as a Fellow for the…

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Bacteria Hidden in Soil Could Yield New Antibiotics

Natural products made by organisms such as soil-dwelling bacteria may be the key to breakthroughs in drug design. Researchers from the Scripps Research Institute have found that bacteria-derived molecules called thiocarboxylic acids could be useful as ingredients for the next generation of antibiotics. “We use natural products as an inspiration for chemistry, biology and drug discovery,” Ben Shen, PhD, professor and co-chair of the Department of Chemistry at Scripps Research,…

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HOW THE GROWTH AND EVOLUTION OF THE OVER-THE-AIR TV HOME FITS INTO TODAY’S VIEWING LANDSCAPE

Over-the-air (OTA) TV—the programming that we all have access to even if we don’t have a cable or satellite programming subscription—is becoming a big thing again. In fact, it’s one of the best things to happen to cord cutters and cord shavers, as it offers them free TV through a digital antenna. Even better, with the shift to digital broadcasting a decade ago, they’re getting even more channels for free—and…

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Tesla’s Latest Competitor Is a $15,500 Electric Three-Wheeler

It’s all-electric like a Tesla. It’s priced like a Ford Fiesta. It’s one of the oddest-looking vehicles you’ve ever seen — and it may just redefine the commuter car. As General Motors Co. prepares to shut the plant near Toronto that got car-making started in Canada more than a century ago, a new model is taking shape in a tiny production facility in Vancouver’s outskirts. Meet the Solo — a…

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Cold Weather Wreaks Havoc with Batteries in Electric Vehicles, Says AAA

The recent brutal cold snap in many parts of the U.S. undoubtedly put a lot of strain on vehicle batteries, which lose a lot of their cold cranking capacity under such conditions. But what happens when the s battery charging system is the focal point of virtually all vehicles functions —as is the case with electric vehicles? According to recent tests conducted by the AAA, the results were not good.…

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